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Just the Tip: Suggestions For When You Go Heeled

Just the Tip - secure a handgun 4

We are lucky enough to maintain a daily correspondence with a number of dangerous men and women. Many of them are wretched minions beholden to the Mad Duo. Others are just badasses we know. Either way, they frequently relay little tips and ideas we never thought of. Not, perhaps, enough for an article, but worthy of further investigation. Today we’re beginning a new recurring series: Just the Tip. You’ll see this on Tuesdays, though probably not every Tuesday. Keep an eye out for it and let us know what you think. Because today is the first one out the gate you’re actually going to get three (3) tips. Go ahead, count them. Three shall be the number thou shalt count, and the number of the counting shall be three. Four shalt thou not count, neither count thou two, excepting that thou then proceed to three. Five is right out… Mad Duo

Ares_Gear
Today’s article was brought to you in part by Ares Gear — “Stiffer is Better.” (Well, duh.)

Just the Tip 31 May: Suggestions For When You Go Heeled

Secure a Weapon in a Vehicle, Marking Batteries, Carrying AIWB
Matt Jacques

Secure your handgun in a vehicle: If you carry daily, but find yourself in a place where you cannot legally carry, what are your options?  Here’s something that might help; invest in a cable lock from your nearest hardware store. With it you can secure a weapon in your vehicle field expedient fashion.  If it is a big lock, or a cable lock, you can attach it to the seat brackets in the vehicle. These are the most secure points inside the vehicle.  A cable lock through the mag well up through the slide keeps both major components from being stolen, a lock or cable through the trigger guard makes a quick and easy solution but is slightly less secure. Lock it, stow it under the seat out of sight. A simple lock similar to what comes in most handgun cases will work, and you can even drill a hole in the bracket to fit the tether.  Just the Tip 31 May: Suggestions For When You Go Heeled

This can also be a great resource should you get into an accident and need to be transported to the ER, and have no option other than asking the responding officer to take control of your gun (that will typically mean it will be days before you can recover it). This isn’t a perfect fix, nor foolproof, but it is an option to consider for those times when you don’t have any choice about temporarily disarming.

Just the Tip 31 May: Suggestions For When You Go HeeledJust the Tip 31 May: Suggestions For When You Go Heeled

Offset Your Belt for AIWB: If you’re a person who carries AIWB (Appendix Inside the Waist Band), you’ve probably already learned (or have at least been told) that the belt is probably more important that the holster. A tip you may have or have not thought about; start your belt (Ares Aegis is my absolute go –to) off by one belt loop.  This allows you to slim out your front section of waistline and not “stack” your buckle on top of your EDC handgun.  Just like everything EDC, play with it and give it some time to get used to the new feel.

Just the Tip 31 May: Suggestions For When You Go Heeled

SDI
Today’s article brought to you in part by Sonoran Desert Institute.

Mark your batteries: Most optics require batteries. The tip: use a Sharpie to document the month and year to log the battery install date.  This helps remind you of when it was new, or when you might need to replace.  If it is an optic you use for duty, you should already be swapping batteries on a schedule, like you would the batteries in the smoke detector in your home.  The ones I use for training and student loaners are also ones I use for product development and research, so mine only get replaced when they finally fail.
Secure a Weapon in a Vehicle, Marking Batteries, Carrying AIWB

MJ

About the author: Matt Jacques is the training director for Victory First Consulting. A former member of the Department of State’s DSS (Diplomatic Security Service), where he was the Operations Chief for FTU (Firearms Training Unit), he now teaches and consults full time. Jacques was a Marine MP assigned to the Presidential Helicopter Squadron, after which he spent over a decade as police officer. During that time he worked patrol, as an undercover detective and a SWAT team member before surviving a near-fatal injury inflicted by a wanted felon that forced an end to his LE career. Following his recovery, “Jake” spent two years as the Senior Manager for Weapons Integration and Training Operations with FNH USA, where he was involved in every aspect of the SCAR program as well as all development and training aspects of the M249, M240 and the FN SPR sniper rifle systems. He is currently the host of Make Ready TV, the host of 2 Panteao DVDs and appears frequently on Trigger Time. You can follow Victory First Consulting on the web or via their Facebook page.

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