The Glock vs 1911 Debate: Maybe Try DP?

| May 13, 2021
| 1 Comments
Categories: Assorted Ramblings
Tags:

There are people who argue about the superiority of Glocks vs 1911s. Like many other tired gun-world disputes, this argument is as frequently contentious as it is unnecessary. Think 9mm vs.45 ACP or the suitability of a shotgun for home defense – why pick just one?

And that’s why today we’re going to talk about DP: Dual Predilection, and why you should try it.

Why not both gif funny

Here’s the thing about DP: if you relax a little bit, you might just like it. 

Grunts: predilection

1911 vs Glock

Megan JK

What if I were to tell you, un-medicated and of my own free will, that I very much like Glocks and 1911s, and that you don’t have to choose between them. 

And furthermore, unlike fighter pilots, SEALs, SWAT cops, and cross-fitters you don’t have to tell anyone. If you don’t like DP or are afraid of it, that’s okay too! 

You might assume me mad or uninformed for saying so. You might think me an internet troll out to stir up popcorn-eating harassment. And in fairness, sometimes you’d be right. But not this time. I’d lie to you, but not about this. 

There is plenty of value to both of these weapon systems – and in fact to most any firearm of good manufacture – to warrant a cease-fire of the age-old debate. And there is plenty more reason to agree to disagree. Instead of going straight to mockery and castigation, how about we just celebrate Americans who choose to practice and enjoy the rights granted them by the Second Amendment. 

Growing up around firearms, I was probably more fortunate than some in that I had the opportunity for hands-on experience with a variety of makes, models, and calibers. Then that special day in every young girl’s life arrived. That’s right. 

My first crush. Bret Michaels you say? Either of the Coreys from the 80s? (Doesn’t matter which.)

Nay, friends, at 12 years of age I was finally deemed ready to shoot the one and only Colt Model 1911 A1 semi-automatic pistol chambered in .45 ACP. And from that first solid kick, the one only a .45 can give a young girl’s little hands, I was smitten. Boy pheromones had nothing on the subtle tingle of cordite at the back of my throat and the affirmation of that gun’s undeniable potency. 

Pretty sexy stuff.

From there, my journey continued in a predictable fashion of increased complexities and exciting rarities. Still, I kept coming back for that sweet 1911 kiss, of its slim yet sturdy frame and unique grip safety. There was — and is — something indisputably attractive about the classic modesty of that 1911 frame.

Time moved on, as time is wont to do, with new people and new opportunities’ pew-pewing’ their way into my world. 

At eighteen years old, I learned of this almost comically named brand people joked you could “…almost clean in the dishwasher!” Glick, did you say? Gee-lock? The dishwasher gun? No thanks!

But youthful curiosity won me over, even with the terrible buildup. Blind dates are just the worst, aren’t they? 

I was handed a very unusual-looking (within my experience) pistol. Apparently, the hammer had been broken off or intentionally removed, which was disconcerting, but Dishwasher Joke Guy insisted the hammer was hiding inside.

Well. The crazy talk just doesn’t end, does it? Oh Austria, what will you think of next? 

Let me guess, I asked. The safety is hiding in there too? 

It’s on the trigger,” he said, and that’s when I knew I was on hidden video. I definitely had to be on hidden video, and people would soon be mocking me, and Y2K will be a blessing when all the computers kill us. 

If you were wondering, and I don’t care if you are I’m going to tell you anyway, it was a (then relatively new) Glock 26, the so-called “Baby Glock”, and was tiny

So tiny it fit perfectly into my little girl hands…

*snicker*

Dishwasher Joke Guy had added a magazine extension but even without it, I was able to establish a much better grip. Let me impress upon you the fact that this was 1997. Clinton had just started his second term. James Cameron’s Titanic hadn’t hit theaters yet and Chris Farley was still alive. The Glock was alien to me. It felt strange in my hands, the grip angle, the queerly smooth slide, those futuristic tritium sights, and the unusually light weight!

But as odd as it was at first, and despite the fact that disassembling and cleaning it felt pretty close to cheating, it was a blast to shoot. It was just too easy, you know, blind date easy. 

Eventually, however, I returned to my faithful 1911. And how did that homecoming go? It wasn’t awkward at all

As it turned out, I was fortunate to learn at a young age that I’m hammer-fluid. Bi-pisexsual. Maybe Striker-Curious? Mostly I just felt the joy that comes of having a hobby you already enjoy expounded on in a truly provocative manner.

Throughout the years, onto adulthood, I found more Glocks. Later I discovered other brands that utilized the internal striker. But I also found new beauties with that classic look at me out here cocked and locked hammer look, and I just kept enjoying them.

Even my most beloved HK introduced the VP line, with the VP9 being popular enough to merit expanding into more calibers. They are commonplace now, but that wasn’t always the case. Many of you may find it difficult to recall just how unique those first striker-fired pistols were, let alone a handgun with such an abundance of polymer.

However, despite the similarities between polymer-frame, striker-fired pistols, there’s really nothing else quite like a Glock. And the same could be said of the classic 1911 models.

Eventually, I learned of and was surprised by, the fierce battles fought during the (sadly ongoing) 1911 vs. Glock wars. How odd, I thought. Don’t these people know what they’re missing out on here? Both weapons have pros and cons of course, but heck who doesn’t? 

Upon further consideration, however, it occurred to me that had I been just a little older, when I was introduced to the dishwasher-safe pistol, it might not have gone so smoothly. If I’d been a little more set in my ways it might have just seemed too awkward to try; I might not have given that Baby Glock a chance. This possibility was later validated by several friends who’d never put hands on one until they were much older. Just as I’d surmised, it was just too different for them. 

Then of course there’s the 1911 crowd, those who love the classic, the sturdy, the proven, the double World War winning 1911. No new-fangled, forgot to add corners, no-safety-having, plastic pistol is gonna date my daughter!

I can see that, but I don’t see the need for rancor. It’s not worth the debate. They’re both wonderful pistols, they’re just (each respectively) not for everyone. Especially those who prefer, oh I don’t know, a manual safety on their handgun. 

*Insert Blackhawk Down quote and tough guy this is my safety finger wiggle here.*

Can’t we all just get along? Can we not remember that, in the end, we all love the pew-pew. That both a 1911 and a Glock will make a bad guy go bye-bye. 

One weapon might feel better in your hands than the other. Maybe there’s even a third option (DP +1?) Learning what works best for you is half the fun. You’re discovering something new in a hobby you’ve enjoyed for so long. And while like dating it might seem strange at first, the experience may well end with a very satisfying bang. 

So, to both my beloved 1911 and treasured Glock friends, I say this: I dare you to give that blind date a real chance. Hell, even a Hi-Poing might be entertaining once – just don’t make a habit of bringing it around or let your friends see you shoot it. 

Happy shooting, and keep fighting the good fight!

Megan_JK

 

About the Author: Megan Kolisch is a motorcycle-riding, America-loving, Army spouse and Ranger Daughter. Honestly, we should have known more about her before putting her behind the podium, but hey, her snarky comments and frequent witticisms on social pretty well speak for themselves. And we’ll eventually update this anyway, so lighten up Francis.

Megan Kolisch

 

 

 

1 Comment

  1. Wade Hunsinger

    This clearly has the finger prints a writer named Warren Hunsinger all over it. Nice Try, but I would know his writing anywhere. Not to mention, Megan wouldn’t know that the word castigation was even a word, let alone how to use it without his help. I do like the content though. I would have to disagree though having taught pistol classes for the past several years and watching 1911s fail time after time around 50 rounds into training. Put it in the dirt, fail to clean it for months, and the Glock just works!

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *