Colt Monitor – BAR Evolved

If you recently watched The Highwaymen on Netflix, you may have noticed the use of the Colt Monitor. If you were not familiar with the name, don’t feel too bad. The Monitor is one of the rarest of all of Colt’s firearm designs.

Think of the Monitor as an “upgraded” B.A.R. modified and lightened for law enforcement use.1 It is referred to, in fact, as the first official “fighting rifle” of the FBI.2

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The Colt Monitor

by Mike Searson and David Reeder
Colt Monitor - Rock Island Acutions imagery
The Colt Monitor, from Rock Island Auctions, with a focus on the distinctive muzzle device.

 

Colt Monitor shouldered by Ian McCollum of Forgotten Weapons.
Colt Monitor shouldered by Ian McCollum of Forgotten Weapons – like the one from the show, except he really is gonna shoot it. 

Browning Automatic Rifle

One of the most iconic infantry weapons of the early 20th century was the Browning Automatic Rifle. Developed in 1918 it saw limited use in WW 1 and became standard issue to the US Army in 1938 as a portable light machine gun. The BAR saw extensive service in both World War II and the Korean War and even saw limited service in the Vietnam War. The US Army began phasing out the BAR in the late 1950s when it was intended to be replaced by a squad automatic weapon (SAW) variant of the M14 and was without a portable light machine gun until the introduction of the M60 machine gun in 1957.

Originally developed when mounted cavalry was still a thing, the BAR was heavy, with some variants weighing over 20 pounds. Spare ammunition, bipods, barrels, and other parts were intended to be carried via horses.

Some attempts were made to make the BAR more ergonomic such as adding a pistol grip, larger forend, and finned barrel. However, they still proved to be a bit heavy and, for the most part, unwieldy.

Colt Monitor from a book by J.T. Mullins.
Colt Monitor from a book by J.T. Mullins.

Colt Monitor Machine Rifle

In 1931 Colt Patent Fire Arms Co. attempted to address these shortcomings and introduced the Monitor Automatic Machine Rifle (R 80). Intended for use as a true shoulder-fired automatic rifle, the Colt Monitor eliminated the bipod and mounted a pistol grip and buttstock to the lightweight receiver. They also shorted the barrel to 18 in. and fitted with a 4 in. Cutts compensator made by Lyman.

Cyclic rate of fire was about 550 rounds per minute and the Cutts Compensator eliminated much of the recoil of the 30-06 Springfield round when fired on full-auto.

Shooting the Colt Monitor with Forgotten Weapons Ian McCollum.

What was the Colt Monitor?

It was an evolved version of the B.A.R., but it was still a beast. Tipping the scales at 16 lbs. 3 oz. empty, the Monitor had a rate of fire of approximately 500 rpm.

Colt R80 Manual

Typically, the top of the receiver will be marked: “COLT AUTOMATIC MACHINE RIFLE/MODEL R 80 CAL. .30/BROWNING PAT FEB. 4. 1919/APR. 14. 1925, AUG. 4. 1925/COLTS PAT FIREARMS MFG. CO./HARTFORD, CONN. USA”. The raised area behind the ejection port is marked “COLT/MONITOR”. It is fitted with a blade front sight with an integral front sight protector and a tangent rear sight, similar to the Lyman/Thompson SMG sight, that is graduated 2-6 (200-600). It has an all blued metal finish with a walnut stock, forend and pistol grip plates.

Colt Monitor - Brownells

Colt Monitor from Forgotten Weapons

Colt Monitor - Rock Island Auctions

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Colt only produced 125 Monitors. From factory records it can be shown that 90 were purchased by the FBI3 , 11 were purchased by the US Treasury Department and the remainder ended up at state prisons, banks, security companies, and police departments.

Colt Monitor adopted by the FBI
Contemporary document showing Colt Monitor FBI issue. [Special thanks to Historical G-Men.]
The Monitor answered the problem most law enforcement agencies were dealing with in regard to penetration or lack thereof by the 45 ACP round fired from the Thompson SMG. When 45 ACP would not penetrate a car body, the 30-06 most certainly wood.

Colt Monitor like the one from The Highwaymen on sale at Guns America.
A Colt Monitor similar to the one Kevin Costner (as Frank Hamer) purchased; from a recent auction seen on Guns America.

Colt Monitor

Frank Hamer’s Colt Monitor

One of the more famous Colt Monitors was presented to retired Texas Ranger Frank Hamer from Colt for his mission to track down Bonnie & Clyde. It bears the serial number C-103168. This was (supposedly) the one depicted in the movie.

This was one of the flaws in The Highwaymen movie. Whether or not Colt presented Hamer with a Monitor, he definitely did not buy one “off the shelf”.  Because none of the 125 Monitors manufactured ever went to a civilian gun shop or sporting goods store, at least not in 1934.

Weapons from the final gunfight with Bonnie & Clyde, from the Texas Ranger Museum.
Weapons from the final Bonnie & Clyde gunfight, Texas Ranger Museum, unknown PC. 

The movie showed Hamer’s partner, Manny Gault using the Colt Monitor in the ambush of Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow. Hamer actually loaned the Colt Monitor to Dallas Deputy Ted Hinton.

Hinton was a part of the posse because he knew and could identify on sight both Barrow and Parker.

Some sources say that Hinton borrowed the Monitor from a National Guard Armory, when in fact he borrowed the Monitor from Hamer. The Monitor was never a part of any US Military inventory, much less a Texas National Guard Armory.

If you can find one today that is transferable the price can range from $90,000 to $140,000 and one with a provenance such as Hamer’s would easily double that. You can see what’s available at Rock Island Auction, but you’re gonna want to ask for an increase in your allowance first.

 


 

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Colt Monitor: The First Official FBI Fighting Rifle

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Browning BAR & Colt Monitor

Brownells | From the Vault

There is a whole slew of historical videos on the Brownells YouTube channel. Just check out the From the Vault series. 

Browning Automatic Rifle R80 – on the range

You’ll see Frank Hamer (Costner) laying down the hate with a Colt Monitor in the trailer, below.

But first, a look at Gun History Jesus shooting one for real:

Ian McCollum firing the R80 Colt Monitor

 

 


1 Of course, it wasn’t just for law enforcement use. Some of the bad guys had them too. John Paul Chase used a Colt Monitor during the 1934 gunfight that ended the career of Lester Joseph “Baby Face Nelson” Gillis. Special Agent Herman E. Hollis and Inspector Samuel P. Cowley of the Department (later Bureau) of Investigation were murdered in that encounter (Hollis was killed on the scene and Cowley died shortly thereafter.

Cowley engaged, but he cannot have done too well, shooting from one racing automobile at another racing automobile on a ribbon of bouncing highway at high speed while the gangsters evaded—they tended to be superb drivers and Les was no exception—and answered in kind. They had three full- or semi-automatic arms: a Thompson in .45 ACP, a Winchester 1907 semi-automatic chambered in .351 Winchester Self-Loading (WSL) and finally, and most terrifyingly, a Colt Monitor, in high-powered .30’-06 Sprg., capable of shredding cars, “bulletproof” vests, most barricades and everything else on earth short of vault steel. But Chase, who was firing the Monitor, never scored the engine hits that would have put the agents out of the game.

On the other hand, the gun cannot have been easy to handle. Though built by Colt and called a “machine rifle,” it was a tactically modified Browning Automatic Rifle, meant for police work, prison guards and industrial security. Colt had built 125 of them in 1931. And as good as it was for law enforcement, it was maybe even better for law breaking. According to an FBI interview with Baby Face associate Joseph “Fatso” Negri, Les had sent two minions to New York to buy “this new machine gun, this new type.” You can readily see why: it was ideal for bank work. The Colt engineers had shortened the stock and barrel, attached a stubby pistol grip behind the trigger guard, enlarged the fore-end, generally lightened it to 14 lbs. and attached a swollen, 12-slot Cutts Compensator to cut down on the muzzle rise that unleashing 20 .30-’06s in two seconds must inevitably generate.

Battle at Barrington, Stephen Hunter: https://www.americanrifleman.org/articles/2017/5/4/a-battle-at-barrington-the-men-the-guns/

2 If you’re researching the Colt Monitor, you probably ought to read Ballou.

In 1931, Colt introduced a BAR specifically geared for the law enforcement community. It was a commercial Browning Automatic Rifle with a pistol grip, shortened barrel and an elaborate compensator. The first two were shipped to Charlestown Prison (later to become Bunker Hill Community College) in Boston, MA on March 25, 1931. (Serial No’s C-102792, C-102793). The official factory designation was R-80 and commonly known as the “Monitor”.

The FBI purchased approximately 90 Monitors and put them on display in a series of propaganda films depicting Mr. Hoover overseeing some of his agents firing (with tracer) at cars. The Monitor did its job well and soon the cars were chopped to pieces by the armor piercing .30-06. This was Mr. Hoover’s weapon of mass destruction as it put his men on equal footing with the likes of Bonnie and Clyde. The Monitor was the first official “Fighting Rifle” of the FBI.

Small Arms Review, J. Edgar Hoover’s WMD, James L. Ballou. http://www.smallarmsreview.com/display.article.cfm?idarticles=1929

 

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3 Early Dept. of Investigation training and courses of fire, to include the Colt Monitor.

Shooting the BAR Colt Monitor - courses of fire Shooting the BAR Colt Monitor - courses of fire Shooting the BAR Colt Monitor - courses of fire

 

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2 thoughts on “Colt Monitor – BAR Evolved

  • April 16, 2019 at 7:23 am
    Permalink

    I thought that Frank Hamer used a model 8 in 35 Remington with a modified magazine in the ambush. Is this correct or not?

    Reply
  • April 15, 2019 at 9:24 pm
    Permalink

    “The movie showed Hamer’s partner, Manny Gault using the Colt Monitor in the ambush of Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow. Hamer actually loaned the Colt Monitor to Dallas Deputy Ted Hinton.

    Hinton was a part of the posse because he knew and could identify on sight both Barrow and Parker.

    Some sources say that Hinton borrowed the Monitor from a National Guard Armory, when in fact he borrowed the Monitor from Hamer. The Monitor was never a part of any US Military inventory, much less a Texas National Guard Armory.”

    Something not to be over looked is the fact that after the ambush had taken place; Ted Hinton and Bob Alcorn made a
    “re-enactment” film clip of their role in the ambush. In this re-enactment film footage, Ted Hinton is not armed with a Monitor. Without a doubt he is armed with a full sized military BAR. The film shows him holding it in one scene and firing it from the ambush hide in another scene.

    This means one of two things. Either Hinton DID have a borrowed National Guard BAR or Hinton used one of the BARs seized out of Barrow’s car for the re-enactment.

    Reply

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